Illusion of Justice – 2014 report

I found this report recently – it’s from 2014. It discusses the role the FBI and local law enforcement have played in terrorist-related crimes.

I have been under some type of surveillance by the police – I call them the FAUX-lice because ***real cops*** don’t behave this way.

Here’s a quote, and the source is below.

Indeed, in some cases the Federal Bureau of Investigation may have created terrorists out of law-abiding individuals by conducting sting operations that facilitated or invented the target’s willingness to act. According to multiple studies, nearly 50 percent of the more than 500 federal counterterrorism convictions resulted from informant-based cases; almost 30 percent of those cases were sting operations in which the informant played an active role in the underlying plot. In the case of the “Newburgh Four,” for example, a judge said the government “came up with the crime, provided the means, and removed all relevant obstacles,” and had, in the process, made a terrorist out of a man “whose buffoonery is positively Shakespearean in scope.”

Illusion of Justice July 21, 2014

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Letter to the Senate Intelligence Committee

Please feel free to use portions of this letter to write to the Senate Intelligence Committee. If we get enough people, perhaps we can get them to investigate this, like they did in 1975. And, btw, I will help write or edit material for TIs for “dana” (donation). Thank you!

Senate Intelligence Committee

211 Hart Senate Office Building

Washington, DC 20510

Dear Senate Intelligence Committee:

I am a registered voter with the Democrat Party and live in XXX, MD. I had the privilege of attending the Senate Intelligence Committee Hearing today with FBI Director James Comey (Counter-terrorism, Counterintelligence, and the Challenges of “Going Dark”). Thank you for providing public access to this important hearing.

In preparation for attending the hearing, I gave a cursory look at the FBI’s tactics for handling encryption. I found information on The Intercept (https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/07/06/hacking-team-spyware-fbi/) indicating “The DEA, FBI and Army bought Hacking Team’s software through a company called Cicom, which for several years served as a middleman for Hacking Team’s US business.” In fact, the article (Leaked Documents Show FBI, DEA and US Army Buying Italian Spyware) states this software allows users to “take remote control of suspects’ computers, recording their calls, emails, keystrokes and even activating their cameras.” In addition, this information was printed in Politico (July 7, 2015) and, according to their article, it also appeared in Wired. Politico refers to the software as thwarting “encryption by infecting devices so it can monitor communications before they’re encrypted or after they’re decrypted.” The article refers to this software as a potential backup to another system the FBI uses (http://www.forbes.com/sites/thomasbrewster/2015/07/06/us-gov-likes-hacking-team/).

In light of Director Comey’s humble insistence that he does not possess any solutions and he believes Silicon Valley could provide innovative ideas, I am bewildered at the contrast between the media and the hearing, both in terms of the quality and quantity of content.

In fact, I was sorely disappointed I did not learn more from today’s hearing. I attended for personal reasons and was looking to attain a fuller understanding of my situation. Briefly, I worked at a federal contractor, experienced mobbing (adult bullying), and was forced out. I recreated my life only to have it all unravel again. Last year, I started to experience mobbing again as well as organized stalking, which involves stalking, harassment, and surveillance. To my surprise, I learned the FBI used these tactics in Cointelpro, which this committee investigated in 1975. Back then, the FBI targeted civil rights activists, war protesters, and various other law-abiding and non-violent citizens.

Apparently, yesterday’s “communists” are today’s “terrorists.” Many (including thousands of Targeted Individuals like myself and another woman present at the hearing today) share this sentiment. Recently (June 30, 2015), Truth Out printed an article titled Protest is the New Terror: How US Law Enforcement is Working to Criminalize Dissent. The author states, “…the FBI, working with local police have directed their resources as much against protesters, dissenters and those practicing and [sic] civil disobedience as they have against the threat represented by terrorists, whether homegrown “lone wolves” or organized outside groups.”

In my own situation, one of my co-workers said to me, “This is what you get when you mess with the police.” One week later, in August of 2014, I noted an abnormal police presence wherever I went. It continues to this day, along with the stalking, harassment, and other forms of surveillance. Surely, a whistle blower and activist like me – a middle-aged, law-abiding, tax-paying breast cancer survivor who served in the Peace Corps and has written about health and human rights – does not warrant neither the resources nor the punishment inflicted. I would like to remind this committee of the words from the original investigation of Cointelpro:

We have examined the collection of intelligence about the political advocacy and actions and the private lives of American citizens. That information has been used covertly to discredit the ideas advocated and to “neutralize” the actions of their proponents. As Attorney General Harlan Fiske Stone warned in 1924, when he sought to keep federal agencies from investigating “political or other opinions” as opposed to “conduct . . . forbidden by the laws”:

When a police system passes beyond these limits, it is dangerous to the proper administration of justice and to human liberty, which it should be our first concern to cherish.

. . . There is always a possibility that a secret police may become a menace to free government and free institutions because it carries with it the possibility of abuses of power which are not always quickly apprehended or understood. 7

Our investigation has confirmed that warning. We have seen segments of our Government, in their attitudes and action, adopt tactics unworthy of a democracy, and occasionally reminiscent of the tactics of totalitarian regimes. We have seen a consistent pattern in which programs initiated with limited goals, such as preventing criminal violence or identifying foreign spies, were expanded to what witnesses characterized as “vacuum cleaners”,” sweeping in information about lawful activities of American citizens.

The tendency of intelligence activities to expand beyond their initial scope is a theme which runs through every aspect of our investigative findings. Intelligence collection programs naturally generate ever-increasing demands for new data. And once intelligence has been collected, there are strong pressures to use it against the target.

Thank you again for the public hearing. I do hope you will consider my story and know that there are thousands out there going through very similar circumstances. Please protect our rights in concert with protecting the security of the nation and preserving the democracy our forefathers and mothers created so that we may live in freedom.

Center for Constitutional Rights – Know your rights with federal agencies

I’ve been browsing this website Center for Constitutional Rights and think others may be interested in it, too. Here is a brochure called

If an Agent Knocks

I just glanced over the brochure. It explains the rights of the FBI, NSA, etc. and the rights of citizens. Basically, as most of us have learned (the hard way), these federal agencies have a lot of leeway when it comes to surveillance, intimidation, and harassment. However, I think you’ll find the organization and its resources helpful.

Cointelpro resurrection

Many in the TI community believe gang stalking stems from a covert FBI program previously called Cointelpro. Cointelpro targeted dissidents, which is pretty much what the current program is doing – targeting whistle blowers, activists, writers, etc.

Here is a sworn testimony from Ted Gunderson, a former FBI agent, who worked in a supervisory capacity in Cointelpro and who believes it began again in the 1980s, targeting innocent citizens, and increased in “scope, intensity, and sophistication.”

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_8Dp145O950bTF5QTV6X2tJaE0/edit?pli=1   Sworn Affidavit FBI Chief

Here are the documents from the last Cointelpro. A group of citizens broke into a local FBI office in Media, PA and stole files. They remained anonymous but are going to go public in a documentary (link below) coming up in May.

http://www.aarclibrary.org/publib/church/reports/vol6/html/ChurchV6_0181a.htm

Here is the documentary – be sure to watch it in May.

http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/1971/film.html

FBI knows all about ‘moral surrender’

Saw this article in the Washington Post this week (using another link here). The FBI director wants agents to go to the Holocaust museum to learn not to surrender individual morality to groups (or authority). Isn’t this the agency that invented Cointelpro?! Its very nature is dependent on moral surrender, as is all human rights violations and atrocities the world has witnessed.

FBI director: Holocaust teaches not to surrender individual morality to the group

In their minds, the murderers and accomplices of Germany, and Poland, and Hungary, and so many, many other places didn’t do something evil. They convinced themselves it was the right thing to do, the thing they had to do. That’s what people do. And that should truly frighten us.